s

Tag Archives: Insureds

Orange County Lawyer Publishes Article in July 2018 edition by Robert J. McKennon Entitled “Insurers’ Intermediaries: The Implications of Actions Taken by Agents, Employers, and Third-Party Administrators”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Agent/Broker, Bad Faith, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Health Insurance, Legal Articles, Life Insurance July 13, 2018

In July 2018, The Orange County Bar Association published an article written by Robert J. McKennon and Stephanie L. Talavera of the McKennon Law Group PC in the Orange County Lawyer.  The article addresses the liability implications of the relationship between insurers and various types of intermediaries.  As the article explains, depending on the nature of the relationship between the insurer and others involved in the process, the insurer may be held liable for the actions of those who act as its intermediaries.  The article gives tips on how to make an insurer vicariously liable for the acts of those functioning as intermediaries in the insurance process.

Insurers’ Intermediaries: The Implications of Actions Taken by Agents, Employers and Third-Party Administrators

Read More
0

Opportunistic Rescission: When Do Insurers Waive their Right to Rescind an Insurance Policy?

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Agent/Broker, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, News, Waiver & Estoppel July 12, 2018

All too often, we see insurance companies deny insurance claims by attempting to opportunistically rescind insurance policies. This practice has become more prevalent in recent years as insurers look for ways to deny insurance claims.

Anyone who has purchased a disability, life or health insurance policy is likely familiar with the significant paperwork involved in the insurance application process. The paperwork includes policy notices, policy applications, supplemental policy applications, personal history questionnaires, policy warnings, medical examination documents, etc. These will include numerous and detailed questions relevant (and often not so relevant) to the risk being insured. An insurance agent or broker will ask questions on the policy application and often additional questions not on the application. Only after the applicant …

Read More
0

Ninth Circuit Interprets the Health Parity Act in Favor of Insureds Seeking Health Insurance Benefits

Posted in: ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, News June 14, 2018

Insurance companies often attempt to provide different levels of benefits for the treatment of physical injuries and mental health issues in the same policy.  Mental health parity describes the equal treatment of mental health conditions and non-mental health conditions in insurance plans. When a plan or policy has parity, it means that if a covered person is provided unlimited doctor visits for a chronic condition like diabetes then that person must offer unlimited visits for a mental health condition, such as depression or schizophrenia.  Under federal law, health insurance plans must have parity in benefits.

The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, 29 U.S.C. § 1185a, requires that if a plan provides …

Read More
0

Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Article on May 24, 2018 by Robert McKennon Entitled “Preexisting Condition Doesn’t Preclude Coverage”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, News May 28, 2018

In the May 24, 2018 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, the Daily Journal published an article written by the McKennon Law Group’s Robert J. McKennon.  The article addresses a recent case by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which held that if an insured with a preexisting medical condition suffers from an accidental injury, the insured is not precluded from recovery under an accidental death and dismemberment policy if the preexisting condition did not substantially contribute to the injury.  Insurers often attempt to use preexisting conditions as an excuse to deny payment under AD&D policies.  This recent Ninth Circuit opinion helps insureds by making it clear that a preexisting condition’s slight contribution to an injury is insufficient to …

Read More
0

Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Small Firm Profile on the McKennon Law Group PC Entitled “Shifting Allegiance: No Longer Insurers’ Advocates, McKennon Law Group Attorneys Stand Up for Policyholders”

Posted in: Bad Faith, Breach of Contract, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Bad Faith, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, Life Insurance, Long Term Care Insurance, News, Retirement Plans May 10, 2018

In the May 7, 2018 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, Daily Journal Staff Writer Melanie Brisbon authored a “small firm profile” article on the McKennon Law Group PC.  The article covers the firm’s path to success, starting with its unconventional background: several of the firm’s attorneys left established careers defending insurance companies before “shifting allegiance” to represent insureds, policyholders and claimants.  The firm started with three lawyers, including founding partner Robert J. McKennon and senior associate Scott E. Calvert.  Now, the firm consists of five attorneys and has a thriving practice in insurance litigation representing policyholders, especially involving life, health and disability insurance cases governed by insurance bad faith or ERISA.  The text portion of the profile is …

Read More
0

Fee-Shifting: When are Attorneys' Fees Recoverable in ERISA Cases?

Posted in: Attorneys Fees, Attorneys' Fees, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Legal Articles February 13, 2018

Challenging a wrongfully denied claim for life, health, long-term disability or accidental death and dismemberment benefits can be a very time-consuming endeavor for law firms handling these types of cases. The resources required to fight a sophisticated insurer can quickly become very expensive. Without the ability to collect attorney’s fees, many wrongfully denied insurance claims would go unchallenged, not for lack of merit, but due to a lack of economic viability. Fortunately, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, or ERISA, allows for recovery of attorneys’ fees upon a showing of some degree of success on the merits. In other words, a meritorious lawsuit under ERISA will almost certainly result in making the culpable party (usually the insurer who …

Read More
0