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Tag Archives: Insureds

Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Article on August 28, 2019 by Robert McKennon Entitled “Ruling Could Send Shock Waves Through ERISA Claims Industry”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, Life Insurance, News, Retirement Plans September 04, 2019

In the August 28, 2019 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, the Daily Journal published an article written by the McKennon Law Group PC’s Robert J. McKennon.  The article addresses a recent case by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, Dorman v. Charles Schwab, which overruled the Ninth Circuit precedent Amaro v. Continental Can Co. and enforced an arbitration clause in a pension plan on the basis that Supreme Court precedent had impliedly overruled its opinion in Amaro.  Given the expansive reading of arbitration clauses by the Supreme Court and now the Ninth Circuit, it is likely that more ERISA pension claims will be litigated on an individualized basis and will be litigated in arbitration proceedings.

Ruling

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Breach of Fiduciary Duty under ERISA: Ninth Circuit Clarifies That Mere Disclosure of Plan Documents Is Insufficient “Actual Knowledge” to Trigger Statute of Limitations

Posted in: Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Fiduciary Duty, Insurance Litigation Blog, Pension Benefits, Statute of Limitations January 23, 2019

In pension and savings plan cases, it can often take several years before an employee realizes that there has been a breach of fiduciary duty.  Typically, an employee’s financial loss triggers an investigation that later reveals the facts of the breach.  But how long does an employee have to bring a claim in court?  The answer depends on the employee’s “actual knowledge” of the facts of the breach or violation.  There is a conflict among federal circuit courts of appeal on whether an employee should be deemed to have knowledge of 401(k) prospectuses and fund information simply because the employer makes this information available to the employee.  In a recent decision by the Ninth Circuit, Sulyma v. Intel Corp. Investment

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Court Says the Development of a Disabling Condition after Surgery for an Unrelated Condition Does Not Preclude Recovery of ERISA Disability Benefits under Pre-Existing Condition Exclusion

Posted in: Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Pre-existing Conditions January 16, 2019

Insurance companies often seek to exclude insureds from coverage through their long-term disability (“LTD”) plans by asserting the pre-existing condition exclusion.  If an applicant for LTD benefits has a non-disabling condition or becomes disabled as a result of a condition that developed after corrective surgery for an unrelated condition, is the applicant excluded from receiving benefits?  In a plaintiff-friendly decision, Hines v. Unum Life Ins. Co. of Am., 2018 WL 6599404 (N.D. Ohio Dec. 17, 2018), the court held that the plaintiff-disability claimant could not be excluded from coverage due to a vision disability on either the basis that she had received a diagnosis for a non-disabling condition before she became disabled or that she had developed a new …

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If You Must Miss Work Two Days a Month Due to a Disabling Condition, Are You Precluded from Working in Any Occupation Under a LTD Policy?

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Policy Interpretation December 19, 2018

Facing a long-term disability (“LTD”) claim, ERISA plan participants under LTD policies can count on the fact that insurance companies will search for ways to escape payment of the monthly LTD benefits they promised their insureds.  These insurers often point out that insureds continue to work in their occupation between their initial diagnosis and the claim date, or that an insured’s job is sedentary and thus he or she is not precluded from performing light physical activities, or that an insured’s disabling condition is episodic and the symptoms do not render the insureds continuously disabled.  Most disability claimants have days where symptoms are better than others and therefore they cannot work continuously in any given month, missing several days of …

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Breach of Fiduciary Duty under ERISA: Making the Insurer or Plan Administrator Responsible for their actions towards a Plan’s Participants and Beneficiaries

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Equitable Relief, ERISA, Fiduciary Duty, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, Waiver & Estoppel November 06, 2018

In a previous blog, we addressed the doctrines of equitable estoppel and waiver when the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) governs their insurance or pension plan.  As we explained, both doctrines provide an insured with methods of forcing an insurance company to honor its word and previous conduct.  However, insureds often have difficulty invoking the doctrines.  ERISA governs a wide variety of plans that provide life insurance, disability insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance and pension benefits.  Given the challenges of invoking equitable estoppel and waiver in the ERISA context, do plan participants and their beneficiaries have other ERISA specific tools to force insurers to honor their word and previous conduct?  Luckily, they do.  A lawsuit …

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Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Article on October 26, 2018 by Robert McKennon Entitled “Court says insurer can’t dodge coverage through ‘technical escape hatch’”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, Life Insurance, News October 29, 2018

In the October 26, 2018 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, the Daily Journal published an article written by the McKennon Law Group’s Robert J. McKennon.  The article addresses a recent case by the California Court of Appeal, which held that the notice-prejudice rule precluded the denial of life insurance benefits based upon the insured’s failure to give timely notice of disability as required under a disability premium waiver provision in the life insurance policy.  Insurers often attempt to argue that a technical violation of the notice requirements voids their claim where there exists no prejudice to them.  This recent opinion helps to reinforce the notice-prejudice rule in California and helps to protect insureds.

This article is posted with …

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Waiver and Estoppel in the Ninth Circuit Post Salyers v. Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.

Posted in: Equitable Relief, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, Waiver & Estoppel October 16, 2018

Waiver and equitable estoppel serve as some of the legal systems’ fundamental checks on the fairness of a party’s actions.  Both doctrines serve to prevent an individuals and insurers from performing actions contradictory to what they have previously guaranteed or established via their conduct.  “A waiver occurs when a party intentionally relinquishes a right or when that party’s acts are so inconsistent with an intent to enforce the right as to induce a reasonable belief that such right has been relinquished.”  Salyers v. Metro. Life Ins. Co., 871 F.3d 934, 938 (9th Cir. 2017) (internal quotations omitted).  Equitable estoppel “holds the [individual] to what it had promised and operates to place the person entitled to its benefit in the …

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Insurance Company Bias in ERISA Cases: Hartford’s History of Bias and Discovery of an Insurer’s Biased Claims Administration Process

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Conflict of Interest, Disability Insurance, Discovery, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance September 26, 2018

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”), a 1974 federal law, sets minimum standards for many employee benefit plans and serves to provide protection for individuals in these plans.  Discovery in ERISA cases is often limited because the statute’s primary goal is to provide inexpensive and expeditious resolution to employee benefit claims.  District courts are generally limited to the administrative record unless a so-called structural conflict of interest exists.  Considering that insurers make benefit determinations on life, health and disability insurance claims and profit when an adverse decision is made, this scenario creates an inherent conflict of interest whenever an insurer administers a claim.

Courts find that a conflict of interest exists where the “entity that administers the plan, such …

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“Sole Cause” Provisions in Accidental Death and Dismemberment Policies: Are ERISA Claimants Getting a Fair Shake?

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Policy Interpretation August 22, 2018

According to the Centers for Disease Control, unintentional injury is the leading cause of death among people ages 1 to 44.  For this reason, Accidental Death and Dismemberment (“AD&D”) Insurance should be an essential component of insurance coverage for most families.  As preventative care expands and baby boomers remain active, accidental deaths will likely continue to rise as the leading cause of death among individuals.  While AD&D coverage is important to protect families from unforeseen injuries and death that can have severe financial repercussions, insurance companies do not like to pay these claims as they often attempt to limit the scenarios in which an insured can recover an AD&D benefit by placing “sole cause” provisions in AD&D policies.  These provisions …

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Sitting: If you are Unable to do it, are you Totally Disabled Under a Long-Term Disability Policy?

Posted in: Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Policy Interpretation August 03, 2018

While most people tend to have a common-sense view of what it means to be disabled, under long-term disability (“LTD”) policies, an insured must satisfy the terms of a disability policy and its specific definitions of “disability” to receive LTD benefits.  Within the first two years of a disability claim, “disability” in a policy is normally defined as the inability to perform the essential duties of one’s own job. Thereafter, “disability” is usually defined as being prevented from performing one or more essential duties of any occupation for which an insured is qualified by education, training and experience.  This “own occupation” versus “any occupation” analysis is the source of a substantial amount of judicial opinion.

Insurance companies typically argue that

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