The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim – Part Six: Independent Medical Evaluations and Peer Reviews

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog September 26, 2019

In this several-part blog series titled The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim, we discuss the basics of an ERISA life, health, accidental death and dismemberment and disability claim, from navigating a claim, to handling a claim denial and through preparing a case for litigation.  In Part Six of this series, we discuss Independent Medical Evaluations and Peer Reviews.  Our focus in this article will be mostly on disability insurance claim denials.

When an insurer examines a disability claim or appeal, it has the medical records examined by medical evaluators, typically a nurse or doctor.  In theory, this allows the insurer to determine whether the claim has merit.  In practice, it is typically a way …

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Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Article on August 28, 2019 by Robert McKennon Entitled “Ruling Could Send Shock Waves Through ERISA Claims Industry”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, Life Insurance, News, Retirement Plans September 04, 2019

In the August 28, 2019 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, the Daily Journal published an article written by the McKennon Law Group PC’s Robert J. McKennon.  The article addresses a recent case by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, Dorman v. Charles Schwab, which overruled the Ninth Circuit precedent Amaro v. Continental Can Co. and enforced an arbitration clause in a pension plan on the basis that Supreme Court precedent had impliedly overruled its opinion in Amaro.  Given the expansive reading of arbitration clauses by the Supreme Court and now the Ninth Circuit, it is likely that more ERISA pension claims will be litigated on an individualized basis and will be litigated in arbitration proceedings.

Ruling

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Speca v. Aetna: “Rush to Judgment” in Just 14 Days Violates ERISA Rights to Full and Fair Review and Appeal

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog August 22, 2019

ERISA guarantees claimants a “full and fair review” as well as an appeal of any denial by the insurance company.  Can a disability claims insurer deny a claim too quickly and thus violate its duty to provide a full and fair review?  A recent decision answered “yes” to this question.  In Speca v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 2019 WL 3754210 (D. Nev. August 8, 2019), the court ruled that Aetna Life Insurance Company (“Aetna”) did not provide a “full and fair review” and effectively cut off any meaningful access to an appeal when it denied a claim in just 14 days (without even waiting to receive any medical records).

Plaintiff, Paul Speca, worked at Home Depot until November 6, 2015 …

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The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim – Part Four: Denial of an ERISA Disability Claim or Appeal

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog August 16, 2019

In this several-part blog series titled The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim, we discuss the basics of an ERISA life, health, accidental death and dismemberment and disability claim, from navigating a claim, to handling a claim denial and through preparing a case for litigation.  In Part Four of this series, we discuss ERISA claim denials.  Our focus in this article will be mostly on disability insurance claim denials.

When denying a claim, an insurer is required to provide a written explanation of the basis of its denial.  Under Section 503 of ERISA, “every employee benefit plan shall . . . provide adequate notice in writing to any participant or beneficiary whose claim for benefits …

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The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim – Part Two: Filing an ERISA Disability Claim

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog August 13, 2019

In this several-part blog series titled The Basics of an ERISA Life, Health and Disability Insurance Claim, we discuss the basics of an ERISA life, health, accidental death and dismemberment and disability claim, from navigating a claim, to handling a claim denial and through preparing a case for litigation.  In Part Two of this series, our focus in this article will be on the filing of a claim.

Often, clients contact our firm before they have filed any life, health, accidental death and dismemberment and disability claim for benefits with their insurer.  In these circumstances, we can assist them on an hourly or contingency fee basis.  Our firm is able to put the client in the best position possible …

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A “Three-Year” Limitations Period in a Disability Policy Can Extend California’s Two-Year Statutory Limitations Period for Insurance Bad Faith

Posted in: Disability Insurance, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles August 06, 2019

Life, health and disability insurers are always looking for ways to deny insurance claims. When they do so unreasonably, insured policyholders may be able to sue them for insurance bad faith under California law. Count on insurers to argue everything they can to defeat a bad-faith claim, including asserting the statute of limitations for bad-faith claims. Life, health and disability insurance plaintiff attorneys must remain current as to changes in the law so they can defeat these insurance company tactics. One notable question they must answer is this: Can a disability policy provision setting forth the timing of a lawsuit against the insurer “extend” California state tort law (e.g., statute of limitations to three years) from the statutory two-year limitations …

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Cassim v. Allstate Insurance: Attorney’s Fees in Contingency-Fee “Bad Faith” Cases

Posted in: Attorneys' Fees, Bad Faith, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles July 26, 2019

Since 2004, when the California Supreme Court ruled that a “portion” of contingency attorney’s fees are recoverable in bad-faith insurance cases, plaintiffs and their lawyers have been able to recover attorney’s fees based in part on the specific terms of the contingency-fee retainer agreement.  For starters, in order to recover attorney’s fees in these actions, a policyholder must prove that (1) contractual benefits were withheld in bad faith, and (2) reasonable fees were incurred by the policyholder to recover those benefits.  However, any attorney’s fees incurred merely to prove the alleged “bad faith” claims are not recoverable at all; only fees incurred to prove actual coverage are recoverable.  Cassim v. Allstate Insurance, 33 Cal.4th 780, 811 (2004).

In Cassim

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In Harlow v. MetLife, Judge Bernal Brings Clarity to Disputes Involving “Reasonable” Attorneys’ Fees Adopting Standards Favorable to ERISA Claimants

Posted in: Attorneys Fees, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles June 19, 2019

The topic of attorneys’ fees has long been of interest to insurance lawyers and clients alike.  Recently, the courts have grappled with issues such as: When are attorneys’ fees recoverable? What types of billing practices are reasonable?  What are reasonable hourly rates?  Attorneys want the assurance that the fees they charge will be deemed “reasonable,” and defendants (the insurance companies) want to know when they can raise defenses to the amount of an attorneys’ fees they may be expected to pay.  In this article, we will consider a recent case that has helped bring some clarity to the issue of “reasonable” fees for legal work.  Robert J. McKennon of McKennon Law Group PC acted as an expert in this case …

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Tenth Circuit Finds that Policy Terms in an ERISA Plan Did Not Unequivocally Grant an ERISA Administrator Discretion to Interpret Plan Terms, Applies De Novo Review

Posted in: Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Policy Interpretation, Standard of Review May 17, 2019

Insurance companies acting as ERISA plan administrators often are guilty of abusing their discretion to interpret policy language related to the level of benefits payable to a claimant under a long-term disability (“LTD”) policy in a manner most beneficial to them, rather than the claimant.  In a recent decision by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, Hodges v. Life Insurance Company of North America, 920 F.3d 669 (10th Cir. 2019), the court addressed the ability of insurance companies such as Life Insurance Company of North America (“LINA”) from interpreting policy language that may determine the level of benefits payable to a claimant.

In Hodges, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the ruling of the district court that …

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Ten Things to Consider and Look For in Your ERISA Short-Term and Long-Term Disability Plans When Selecting Benefits or You Want to File a Claim

Posted in: Administrative Record, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Insurance Questions and Concepts, Statute of Limitations February 28, 2019

1. Obtain a full copy of your plan and administrative record. The full plan will not typically be a benefit summary or a print-out from a website.  It will be fairly long and many definitions and it will recite your ERISA plan terms, policies and procedures for filing a claim and handling the claim, claim denials, appeals of claim denials, etc.  The claims administrator will likely not have a copy of the full plan.  You can request a copy of the full plan from your Employer’s Human Resources department or often from the claims administrator (the insurer or third-party administrator).  You can request a copy of the administrative record from the claims administrator, which is often an insurance company such …

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