Ten Things to Consider and Look For in Your ERISA Life and/or Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) Insurance Plans When You Select Benefits or File a Claim

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Administrative Record, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Insurance Questions and Concepts, Life Insurance, Statute of Limitations March 18, 2019

1. Obtain a full copy of your plan. The full plan will not typically be a benefit summary or a print-out from a website. It will be fairly long and many definitions and it will recite your ERISA plan terms, policies and procedures for filing a life insurance or AD&D claim and handling the claim, claim denials, appeals of claim denials, etc.  The claims administrator will likely not have a copy of the full plan.  You can request a copy of the full plan from your Employer’s Human Resources department or often from the claims administrator (the insurer or third-party administrator).

2. Read the plan. Your plan document controls the rights and obligations of the parties, including all plan participants …

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Discovery Disputes in ERISA Breach of Fiduciary Duty Cases: Do the Usual Limitations Apply?

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Administrative Record, Disability Insurance, Discovery, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance December 27, 2018

Discovery Disputes in ERISA Breach of Fiduciary Duty Cases: Do the Usual Limitations Apply?

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) manages many of the benefits people receive from their employers.  These benefits include short-term and long-term disability insurance, health insurance, life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance and pension plans.  When a claim under an ERISA plan is denied, the beneficiary usually must file an administrative appeal with the Claims Administrator for the benefits.  If, after filing an administrative appeal, the Claims Administrator still denies the claim, the beneficiary may sue the Claims Administrator to obtain the benefits in question.  ERISA claims differ from more traditional law suits.  A judge, not a jury, determines whether the beneficiary …

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Breach of Fiduciary Duty under ERISA: Making the Insurer or Plan Administrator Responsible for their actions towards a Plan’s Participants and Beneficiaries

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Equitable Relief, ERISA, Fiduciary Duty, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, Waiver & Estoppel November 06, 2018

In a previous blog, we addressed the doctrines of equitable estoppel and waiver when the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) governs their insurance or pension plan.  As we explained, both doctrines provide an insured with methods of forcing an insurance company to honor its word and previous conduct.  However, insureds often have difficulty invoking the doctrines.  ERISA governs a wide variety of plans that provide life insurance, disability insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance and pension benefits.  Given the challenges of invoking equitable estoppel and waiver in the ERISA context, do plan participants and their beneficiaries have other ERISA specific tools to force insurers to honor their word and previous conduct?  Luckily, they do.  A lawsuit …

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Los Angeles Daily Journal Publishes Article on October 26, 2018 by Robert McKennon Entitled “Court says insurer can’t dodge coverage through ‘technical escape hatch’”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Legal Articles, Life Insurance, News October 29, 2018

In the October 26, 2018 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, the Daily Journal published an article written by the McKennon Law Group’s Robert J. McKennon.  The article addresses a recent case by the California Court of Appeal, which held that the notice-prejudice rule precluded the denial of life insurance benefits based upon the insured’s failure to give timely notice of disability as required under a disability premium waiver provision in the life insurance policy.  Insurers often attempt to argue that a technical violation of the notice requirements voids their claim where there exists no prejudice to them.  This recent opinion helps to reinforce the notice-prejudice rule in California and helps to protect insureds.

This article is posted with …

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“Sole Cause” Provisions in Accidental Death and Dismemberment Policies: Are ERISA Claimants Getting a Fair Shake?

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Policy Interpretation August 22, 2018

According to the Centers for Disease Control, unintentional injury is the leading cause of death among people ages 1 to 44.  For this reason, Accidental Death and Dismemberment (“AD&D”) Insurance should be an essential component of insurance coverage for most families.  As preventative care expands and baby boomers remain active, accidental deaths will likely continue to rise as the leading cause of death among individuals.  While AD&D coverage is important to protect families from unforeseen injuries and death that can have severe financial repercussions, insurance companies do not like to pay these claims as they often attempt to limit the scenarios in which an insured can recover an AD&D benefit by placing “sole cause” provisions in AD&D policies.  These provisions …

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Where Did My Long-Term Disability Benefits Go? Termination of Benefits Without Improvement of Insured’s Medical Condition

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog August 15, 2018

Many people purchase accidental death and dismemberment insurance or disability insurance to protect themselves should they ever become injured and unable to work.  If they become injured, they file a claim with their insurance company, and, after a potentially lengthy process, the insurance company may start to pay disability or accidental death and dismemberment benefits.  Sometimes, however, after initially paying disability benefits, an insurer will suddenly change its stance on the insured’s disability and terminate the benefits.  But there is a problem: The insured has not recovered, and his medical condition has not become better.  The insured still cannot return to work.  If the insured was disabled, and nothing has changed, why the sudden termination of benefits?  Thankfully, courts also …

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The Latest Frontier for Forum Selection Clauses: ERISA Policies

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance July 26, 2018

Letters denying an insured’s claim often end by listing what steps an insured can take to challenge an unfavorable determination.  Assuming all administrative appeals have been exhausted, this generally involves filing a lawsuit. Depending on the language in the underlying insurance policy, the denial letter may state that if an insured wishes to bring suit, they must bring suit in a specific court in a particular state that could be on the other side of the country.  Clauses in contracts, such as insurance policies, that require filing suit in a particular jurisdiction are called “forum selection clauses.”

Courts often enforce forum selection clauses.  When determining whether to enforce a forum selection clause, a court will ask if the forum selection

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When Guarding the Henhouse, Some Foxes Go Rogue: When an Insurer’s Conflict of Interest Factors into Administrating Group Long-Term Disability ERISA Plans

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Conflict of Interest, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, News July 25, 2018

Few Americans can retire on their savings alone.  Many workers participate in an employee benefits plans, which serve to provide financial security in case of disability or retirement.  In the case of insurers that decide who qualifies for life, health and disability insurance benefits, there exists a major concern about the significant conflict of interest that exists when these insurers make these decisions and also pay for these benefits.  Will these insurers exalt their own interests of bottom line profitability over the interests of ERISA plan participants and beneficiaries who file claims for life, health and disability benefits? It is not a leap of logic that this conflict of interest results in insurance companies wrongfully denying ERISA benefit claims.

In

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Orange County Lawyer Publishes Article in July 2018 edition by Robert J. McKennon Entitled “Insurers’ Intermediaries: The Implications of Actions Taken by Agents, Employers, and Third-Party Administrators”

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Agent/Broker, Bad Faith, Disability Insurance, ERISA, Health Insurance, Legal Articles, Life Insurance July 13, 2018

In July 2018, The Orange County Bar Association published an article written by Robert J. McKennon and Stephanie L. Talavera of the McKennon Law Group PC in the Orange County Lawyer.  The article addresses the liability implications of the relationship between insurers and various types of intermediaries.  As the article explains, depending on the nature of the relationship between the insurer and others involved in the process, the insurer may be held liable for the actions of those who act as its intermediaries.  The article gives tips on how to make an insurer vicariously liable for the acts of those functioning as intermediaries in the insurance process.

Insurers’ Intermediaries: The Implications of Actions Taken by Agents, Employers and Third-Party Administrators

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Opportunistic Rescission: When Do Insurers Waive their Right to Rescind an Insurance Policy?

Posted in: Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Agent/Broker, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, News, Waiver & Estoppel July 12, 2018

All too often, we see insurance companies deny insurance claims by attempting to opportunistically rescind insurance policies. This practice has become more prevalent in recent years as insurers look for ways to deny insurance claims.

Anyone who has purchased a disability, life or health insurance policy is likely familiar with the significant paperwork involved in the insurance application process. The paperwork includes policy notices, policy applications, supplemental policy applications, personal history questionnaires, policy warnings, medical examination documents, etc. These will include numerous and detailed questions relevant (and often not so relevant) to the risk being insured. An insurance agent or broker will ask questions on the policy application and often additional questions not on the application. Only after the applicant …

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